Kill the King!

Gibtelecom Chess Festival Round Four Report

On 30 January 1649, King Charles I of England was beheaded for treason. 360 years later to the day in Gibraltar there was no treason that we know of, but several players attempted to execute the opposing monarch!

Our first game must have been a huge disappointment for Dutch GM Ivan Sokolov (2657) who held the initiative for the most part, until an unfortunate oversight cost him the game. Still, credit must go to his opponent, Israeli GM Vitali Golod (2575) for spotting the winning combination. Golod moved into a tie for second place with this victory. 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 dxc4 A delayed Queen’s Gambit Accepted. 5.e3 a6 6.a4 Bb4 7.Bxc4 b6 8.0–0 Bb7 9.Qb3 [9.Qe2 is the most popular continuation by far.] 9…Qe7 10.e4!? This enterprising pawn sacrifice by Sokolov creates an unbalanced position which Black must handle with care. 10…Nxe4 [The alternative 10...Bxc3 11.bxc3 Nxe4 gives White excellent play for the pawn after 12.Re1 0–0 13.Ba3 Nd6 14.d5] 11.Re1 Nc6 12.Rxe4 Na5 13.Qc2 Nxc4 14.d5

Gibraltar r4 2

14…Qc5? [Black can offer more resistance with 14...Na5 15.Bg5 Qc5 16.Be3 Qe7] 15.dxe6 [White misses 15.Qb3 with excellent winning chances. For instance, 15...Na5 (or 15...b5 16.axb5 axb5 17.Rxa8+ Bxa8 18.Be3 Nxe3 19.Rxb4 c6 20.dxe6 Nd5 21.exf7+ Kxf7 22.Ne5+ Kg8 23.Rf4+-) 16.Qxb4 Qxb4 17.Rxb4 exd5 18.Bf4±] 15…0–0 And Black returns the favour. The best plan would have been to castle queenside so that the king could head over to where he would have more pieces to help him out. 16.Rh4 White is back in control. If Black advances either the g or h-pawns to stop the mate on h7, White strengthens his attack with Ne4. 16…f5 17.Na2? After all that hard work, White lets Black right back into the game. [Instead, 17.e7 Rfe8 18.Qb3 b5 19.axb5 axb5 20.Rxa8 Bxa8 21.Be3 Qxe7 22.Nxb5 Bd5 23.Rxc4 Bxc4 24.Qxc4+ Kh8 25.h3 would have brought home the point.] 17…Be4 18.Rxe4 fxe4 19.Qxe4 Rad8

Gibraltar r4 3

[19...Rae8 keeps the balance.] 20.Bg5 [20.Bh6 This attractive move clears the back rank and protects the d1 square. 20...gxh6 21.e7 Qxe7 22.Qxc4+ Qf7 23.Qxb4±] 20…Nd2 21.Bxd2 Rxd2 Although White has surrendered his early initiative, the position is still quite even. 22.Rf1?? But one careless move is all it takes to ruin a good game. 22…Rxb2 23.Nc1 [23.Nxb4 also loses to 23...Rxb4 24.Qe2 Re8 though in less spectacular fashion.] 23…Rxf2! 24.Nd3 R2xf3+! A clever tactic. White resigns as mate cannot be avoided. The King is dead!! 0–1

After conceding a draw in the first round, the rising young Azeri star, GM Vugar Gashimov (2723) was back on the top boards in round 4. He was paired against American GM Varuzhan Akobian (2619), a member of the US team that won the bronze at the Dresden Olympiad. 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Nf3 Ngf6 6.Bg5 h6 7.Nxf6+ Nxf6 The night before, Akobian had conducted a master class entitled “My Trials and Tribulations in the French Defence”. He could hardly have foreseen that on the very next day he would obtain more material for this topic. 8.Be3 Nd5 9.Bd3 Nxe3 10.fxe3 Bd6 11.e4 e5 This sacrifices a pawn to disrupt White’s centre. Black is hoping that White’s doubled e-pawns will prove too weak to hold. 12.dxe5 Bc5

Gibraltar r4 4

Akobian had seen this all before, notably in 2002 at the Imre Koenig Memorial in San Francisco when a young Hikaru Nakamura had played 13. Bc4 against him. Instead, Gashimov follows a suggested improvement. 13.Bb5+ c6 14.Qxd8+ Kxd8 15.Bc4 Ke7 16.c3 The identical position was reached in Leko-Ivanchuk, Morelia/Linares 2007 which continued 16…Be6 17. Bxe6 Kxe6 18. Ke2 Bb6 19. Rhf1 Rhf8 20. Rad1 Rad8 21. Rxd8 Bxd8 22. Rd1 Bc7 with equality. 16…Rd8 17.a4 a6 18.Ke2 Be6 19.Bxe6 Kxe6 20.Rhf1 Rd7 21.Rad1 Rxd1 22.Rxd1

Gibraltar r4 5

22…a5? [A subtle but serious inaccuracy. In a similar position in the Leko-Ivanchuk game, Black pulled his bishop back immediately without giving White time to reposition his knight on d3. As a result, he was able to exert sufficient pressure on the e5 pawn to maintain equality. Black should play 22...Bb6 23.g4 Rd8 24.Rxd8 Bxd8 25.Kd3 Bc7 26.Kd4 Bb6+ 27.Kc4 Ba7=] 23.Ne1! The knight is heading for d3. Taking the e5 pawn now becomes a losing proposition for Black. 23…Kxe5? 24. Nd3+ Kd6 25. e5+ Kd5 26. c4+ Kd4 27. Rf1 with a clear advantage for White. 23…Bg1 24.g3 The addition of the last move pair does not significantly alter the position. 24…Bb6 25.Nd3 White’s doubled e-pawns, far from being weak, are fast becoming an annoyance to Black. 25…Ke7 Black decides to step back to avoid knight checks. 26.g4 Rd8 27.Rf1 Bc7 28.h4 Re8 Black is still trying to eliminate the e5 pawn. 29.h5 Kf8 30.Rf5 Kg8 31.Nc5 b6 32.Nd3 Having provoked …b6, White has denied Black the opportunity to drive White’s rook back with …g6. 32…Re7 33.b4 It is time to initiate action on the other flank. 33…axb4 34.cxb4 Kf8 35.Ke3 Ke8 36.g5 hxg5 37.Rxg5 Kf8 38.Rg2 c5 [The pawn is taboo. 38...Bxe5? 39.Rc2 and Black's overloaded rook cannot defend the c6 pawn.] 39.bxc5 bxc5 40.Rc2 Ke8 41.Kf4 Bb6

Gibraltar r4 6

42.Nb2! Re6 43.Nc4 Bc7 44.a5 White patiently improves his position. He now has the advantage in all sectors of the board. 44…Rf6+ 45.Ke3 Ra6 46.Kd3 Ra7 47.Ra2 Ra6 48.Rg2 Kf8 49.Rb2 Ke7 50.Rb5 Rc6 51.Nb6 Kd8 [The e5 pawn stays alive! 51...Bxe5? 52.a6 Bb8 53.Nd5+ Kd6 54.Rxb8+-] 52.Kc4 Re6 53.Na4 Bxa5 54.Nxc5 A final finesse. 54…Rh6 55.Rxa5 Rxh5 56.Kd5 Black resigns 1–0

Elsewhere Greek GM Vasilios Kotronias (2603) had another excellent win, defeating Indian Pental Harikrishna (2673) in 53 moves with black. Kotronias secured an early edge, and gently applied the pressure until it became unbearable. An impressive victory which gives him the sole lead of the tournament on 4/4 after the other two players on maximum points GM Dzagnidze and GM Socko drew with each other. Peter Svidler (2723) was black against GM Lopez Martinez (2540)

Gibraltar r4 7

Svidler decided to unbalance the position here and give up his queen for a rook, knight and pawn by playing 15…Qxb2 16 Rb1 Qxc2 17 Rd2 Qxc3 18 Qxc3 Nxe4 19 Qe3 Nxd2 20 Qxd2 . However, despite this attempt the game ended in a level position after 31 moves and a draw was agreed.

English IM Stephen Gordon (2524) took another step closer to his final GM norm with a creditable draw with Hungarian GM Ferenc Berkes (2651). Michael Roiz (2647) won nicely against Chanda Sandipan (2568)

Gibraltar r4 8

Although material is level and the bishops are of opposite colours, whites pressure on the f7 pawn, coupled with the fact that blacks queenside pawn majority is going nowhere means that white is totally winning. The game ended quickly 48.f5 h5+ 49.Kf4 gxf5 50.exf5 Bf2 51.f6+ 1–0. The king must leave the f7 pawn, and then the king will soon fall himself!

Sometimes you have to keep cool in chess. How about this for a demonstration of cool from Alexander Beliavsky (2646) after his opponent Kristian Szabo (2508) has just played 42 Qd5, threatening to take on f7 with check. How would you defend the threat?

Gibraltar r4 9

Beliavsky simply ignores it with 42…Bc5! when, after 43.Qxf7+ Kh6 white has no checks and the end comes quickly with 44.Nd4 Nf4 45.Ke1 Rg1+ 0–1

GM Boris Avrukh and GM Mikhail Gurevich both won also to complete the group of eight players on 3½/4.

Finally, GM Nakamura (2699) was made to work hard for his point by Mexican IM Uriel Capo Vidal (2336). Nakamura had clearly worked on the two knights v pawn ending following the Sokolov v Trent ending! After 72 moves of stoic play the following position was reached

Gibraltar r4 10

Here black can perhaps hold the position after 72…Rh7 when 73 Nd7 is met by Rh1. However, incredibly accurate defence is required. Unfortunately, black played 72…Rf6 and the ruthless American countered with 73 Kc7 Ka8 74 Nd7 1-0

Round 5 should be just as exciting. Watch the games live at www.gibraltarchesscongress.com

Report compiled by Sean Hewitt with games annotated by Sunil Weeramantry

My Daddy’s a Grandmaster – and so is my Mummy!

Gibtelecom Chess Festival Round Three Report

How many children in the world can claim that both their father and mother are full grandmasters? Well, we don’t know the exact answer – maybe somebody out there can help us? – but we do know that two of them are in the photograph below…

Gibraltar r3 1

Left to right: Anna Cramling-Bellon, Pia Cramling, Weronica Socko

Sitting at the board in the picture is little Anna Cramling-Bellon, daughter of GM Juan Manuel Bellon and GM Pia Cramling (who is also in the photo). Anna made her international competition debut on 29 January here in Gibraltar. On the right, having some fun with Pia Cramling is Weronica Socko, daughter of GM Bartosz Socko and GM Monika Socko. All four parents hold the full GM title. How many other children can boast two GM parents? Other than Weronica’s siblings that is. We can think of maybe one more double GM husband and wife with children but haven’t thought about it too deeply yet. Maybe there are more – can you think of any?

In Round 3 of the Masters event we expected the chess to be hard fought and exciting – and we weren’t disappointed!

The game between perennial Gibraltar participant, Polish GM Bartosz Socko (2631) and former Women’s World Champion, GM Antoaneta Stefanova (2557) of Bulgaria

Gibraltar r3 2

GM Bartosz Socko (2631) – GM Antoaneta Stefanova (2557)

produced one of the tournament leaders after the third round. 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Bc5 Introducing the Neo-Archangelsk variation. 6.c3 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.a4 Bg4 9.h3 Bxf3 10.Qxf3 Na5 11.Bc2 b4 12.d3 Rb8 13.Nd2 0–0 After some minor transpositions, we have now reached the position from Anand-Karpov, FIDE World Chess Championship Finals, Lausanne 1998. 14.Qe2 Re8 15.Nf3 bxc3 16.bxc3 Nb3 17.Bxb3 Anand’s novelty. [17.Rb1 Nxc1 18.Rfxc1 was successful for White in Nithander-Hector, Politiken Cup 2007.] 17…Rxb3 18.d4 exd4 19.cxd4 Rxf3!? An interesting exchange sacrifice introduced by Karpov. 20.Qxf3 Bxd4 21.Ra2 Nxe4 22.Qd3 Qf6 [An improvement that was suggested after the Anand-Karpov game which had continued 22...c5 23.Qxa6 d5 24.a5 when Anand recorded a memorable victory in 42 moves.] 23.Re2 [23.Qxa6 would permit 23...Ng3 24.Rd1 Qe6 with a draw by repetition if White were to choose 25.Rxd4 Qe1+ 26.Kh2 Nf1+] 23…d5 24.Be3 Be5 25.Rc1

Gibraltar r3 3

25…c5? [25...h6 protects the d5 pawn indirectly as the same combination that Socko employs in the game does not work as well here. 26.Qxd5 Nc3 27.Rxc3 Rd8 28.Rc5 Rxd5 29.Rxd5 leaves Black with an edge as White fails to pick up Black's c-pawn along the way.] 26.Qxd5! Nc3 27.Rxc3 Rd8 [Of course not 27...Bxc3?? as Black's back rank weakness spells disaster after 28.Bg5!] 28.Rxc5 Rxd5 29.Rxd5 h6 30.Bxh6 Bc7 31.Bc1 Qc6 32.Rd1 Qxa4 33.Rde1 The position has been simplified greatly to White’s advantage. 33…f6 34.Bb2 Qf4 35.g3 Qf5 36.Re8+ Kh7 37.R1e4 Bd6 38.Bc1 Kg6 39.Rg4+ Kf7 40.Re1 Qf3 41.Be3 a5 42.Kh2 Be5 43.Rc4 Kg6 44.Kg1 Qf5 45.Rg4+ Kf7 46.Rd1

Gibraltar r3 4

46…a4? [Black does better not to abandon the outside pawn and to play 46...g5 as the continuation 47.Rd5 Qb1+ 48.Kh2 Qa2 49.Rd7+ Kg6 50.Ra7 Bc3 for instance, illustrates the difficulties White faces in trying to eliminate it.] 47.Rxa4 Qxh3 48.Ra7+ Kg6 49.Rdd7 Kf5? [Passive defence would give Black good chances to hold as simplifying into a pawn up bishop endgame is insufficient for White to win. 49...Qh8 50.f4 Bb8 51.Rxg7+ Qxg7 52.Rxg7+ Kxg7 53.g4 Kf7 54.Kf2 Ke6 55.Kf3 Kd5 56.Bb6 Bd6 57.Bd8 Ke6 58.Ke4 Bf8 and White cannot make progress.] 50.Rxg7 The loss of this pawn without the simplification seen in the previous variation places Black in serious jeopardy. 50…Ke4 51.Bf4 Qh5 52.Ra4+ Bd4 53.Re7+ Kd3 Black’s position is quite unpleasant and difficult to play even with sufficient time on the clock. 54.Ra3+ Kc4 55.Be3 Be5 56.Kg2 Bd6? [56...Qd1 offers more resistance. White's winning technique would then lie in pushing Black's king to the edge to maximize checkmating opportunities. 57.Ra5 Qd3 58.Rc5+ Kb4 59.Rb7+ Ka4 60.Ra7+ Kb4 61.Rc8 Qe4+ 62.f3! Qd5 63.Rc5 and Black has to give up his queen to stay alive.] 57.Re4+ Kb5 58.Rb3+ Kc6 59.Rb6+ 1–0

Nearby, young English IM Stephen Gordon (2524) gave his chances of securing his third and final GM norm a boost by holding his more experienced opponent, American GM Varuzhan Akobian (2619), to a hard fought draw. 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 0–0 7.e3 b6 The Tartakower System in the Queen’s Gambit Declined. 8.Be2 Bb7 9.Bxf6 Bxf6 10.cxd5 exd5 11.b4 White attempts to control Black’s thematic advance …c5. 11…c6 12.0–0 a5 First employed by former World Champion, GM Anatoly Karpov, in the Leningrad interzonal 1973. 13.bxa5 Two popular alternatives are 13. b5 and 13. a3 13…Rxa5 14.a4 Bc8 15.Qc2 Be6 16.Rfd1 Nd7 [16...c5 proved successful in Tukmakov-Shabalov, Koszalin 1999.] 17.Rab1 Akobian’s treatment of this position, though similar, does not duplicate earlier examples. [17.h3 Be7 18.Bd3 Re8 19.Ne2 Qa8 Greenfeld-M.Gurevich, EU-ch 2001] 17…Qa8 18.Bd3 Rc8 19.h3 Be7 20.Bf5 b5 [20...c5 appears to be a more natural break in light of the placement of Black's rook in relation to White's queen. However, White can keep the c-file closed by playing 21.Ne5 Nxe5 22.dxe5] 21.Bxe6 fxe6 22.Ne5 Nxe5 23.dxe5 b4 24.Ne2 c5 25.Qg6 It is clear that White must begin operations against the enemy king as he is unable to contain the advancing pawns. 25…Ra6 26.Nf4 Rcc6 27.e4 The key. White opens a path for his rooks along the third rank. 27…d4 28.Rd3 Qf8 29.Rg3 Bg5

Gibraltar r3 5

30.Rxg5 Akobian displays excellent judgement as he correctly projects that White’s kingside attack will neutralize Black’s overwhelming material superiority on the other flank. 30…hxg5 31.Qxg5 Rxa4 32.Ng6 Qe8 [32...Qa8 is not any better as White's king will be unassailable on h2 even if Black's queen succeeds in penetrating to the first rank. For instance, 33.f4 Ra1 34.Rxa1 Qxa1+ 35.Kh2 and Black will have to hurry back in defence.] 33.f4 [33.Ne7+? Kf7 34.Nxc6 Qxc6 would recover the exchange but lose the game.] 33…Rca6 34.Kh2 d3 It is amazing that despite his three connected passed pawns, Black does not have a winning continuation. 35.Qh5 Ra1 36.Rxa1 Rxa1 37.f5 exf5 38.exf5 d2

Gibraltar r3 6

In many ways, such positions are relatively easy to handle as the strategy on both sides is forced. 39.Qh8+ Kf7 40.e6+ Kf6 41.Qxe8 d1Q The queen is dead! Long live the queen! 42.Qe7+ Kxf5 43.Nh4+ Ke4 44.Qxc5 Qh1+ 45.Kg3 Qe1+ 46.Kh2 Qh1+ 47.Kg3 Qe1+ and the two players settle for the inevitable. ½–½

Elsewhere, Surya Ganguly (2614) defended well on top board to hold a draw with the black pieces against Peter Svidler (2723) whilst there was something of a shock on board 2. The Greek GM Vasilios Kotronias (2603) has just played 24 Rdh1 to reach the following position

Gibraltar r3 7

Hikaru Nakamura (2699) replied 24…c5?? and lost quickly after 25 Rf4! as the Queen is trapped.

However, the real shock of the round was on board 8 where Georgian GM Nana Dzagnidze (2518) defeated French prodigy Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (2696) whilst playing black. Nana obtained a good position from her Sicillain Dragon opening and then sacrificed the exchange on move 17, following which she used her active pieces to outplay her opponent.

Gibraltar r3 8

English amateur Gary Quillan (2357), having played brilliantly against GM Gashimov in Round 1 followed up by beating Serbian GM Milos Pavlovic (2520) with black. Having reached the following position

Gibraltar r3 9

Now Gary finished the game with 30…Bb7 31 f3 Rd2+ 32 Re2 Rd3 0-1 Due to the dual threats of Rxc3 and Bxf3+

Gibraltar r3 10

Gary Quillan on his way to victory. He was smiling later!

Lets hope that Round 4 on Friday proves to be just as exciting as today! The top pairings are:

GM Dzagnidze, Nana GEO 2518 – GM Socko, Bartosz POL 2631

GM Harikrishna, Pentala IND 2673 – GM Kotronias, Vasilios GRE 2603

GM Gashimov, Vugar AZE 2723 – GM Akobian, Varuzhan USA 2619

GM Lopez Martinez, Josep Manu ESP 2540 – GM Svidler, Peter RUS 2723

GM Ganguly, Surya Shekhar IND 2614 – GM Milov, Vadim SUI 2669

GM Sokolov, Ivan NED 2657 – GM Golod, Vitali ISR 2575

IM Gordon, Stephen J ENG 2524 – GM Berkes, Ferenc HUN 2651

GM Roiz, Michael ISR 2647 – GM Sandipan, Chanda IND 2568

IM Szabo, Krisztian HUN 2508 – GM Beliavsky, Alexander G SLO 2646

GM Avrukh, Boris ISR 2645 – IM Papp, Gabor HUN 2517

GM Gurevich, Mikhail TUR 2624 – IM Cmilyte, Viktorija LTU 2497

Quillan, Gary ENG 2357 – GM Berg, Emanuel SWE 2606

Full details can be found on the tournament website www.gibraltarchesscongress.com

Report compiled by Sean Hewitt and John Saunders with games annotated by Sunil Weeramantry.

The Importance of the Endgame!

Gibtelecom Chess Festival Round Two Report

The 7th Gibtelecom Chess Festival is again being played at the Picturesque Caleta Hotel which overlooks Catalan Bay on the eastern side of the Rock of Gibraltar.

Gibraltar r2 1

The accelerated pairings used at Gibraltar meant that , even though 200 players were playing, there were a number of GM v GM clashes in Round 2. Several of these games from the most prestigious open swiss in the world showed why you should always study your endgames as several games were decided by endgame technique (both good and bad).

Gibraltar r2 2

David Berczes – Peter Svidler

On top board Russian super-GM Peter Svidler (2723) had to negotiate a tricky pairing against Hungarian GM David Berczes (2513).

After black had played 48…Rc5 Berczes was faced the following position

Gibraltar r2 3

The black c pawn looks pretty huge here. After the Hungarian played 49 Rc2 the Russian SuperGM cashed in his advantage for a full point with 49…Kc6 50.Rc1 Kb5 51.Rb1 Rc8 52.e5 fxe5+ 53.Kxe5 Ra8 54.f6 Rxa2 55.Rf1 Ra8 56.f7 c2 57.Ke4 Rf8 58.Kd3 Rxf7 59.Kd4 0–1

Gibraltar r2 4

Hikaru Nakamura

Whilst on board 2 reigning champ Hikaru Nakamura faced the ever popular Swede Pontus Carlsson. Carlsson playing black has just played 32…b5. What was Nakamura’s reply? What would you have played?

Gibraltar r2 5

Nakamura played the remarkable 33.Re1! [How many players would have considered swapping into this opposite coloured bishop ending? Nakamura has clearly judged that his 4 v 1 kingside majority is irresistible, whilst believing that he can hold the queenside] Rxe1 34.Kxe1 Kf7 35.Bc3 Ke6 36.f5+ Kd5 37.Kd2 Ba2 38.h4 Bb1 39.h5 Kc6 40.Ke3 Kb6 41.f6 1–0

Gibraltar r2 6

Keti Arakhamia-Grant

GM-elect Keti Arakhamia-Grant was in trouble early on against India’s Pentala Harikrishna.

Harikrishna,Pentala (2673) – Arakhamia-Grant,Ketevan (2500) [E92]

Gibtelecom Masters Gibraltar (2.4), 28.01.2009

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0–0 6.Be2 e5 7.Be3 Ng4 8.Bg5 f6 9.Bc1 Nc6 10.d5 Ne7 11.h3 Nh6 12.h4 Nf7 13.h5 f5 14.hxg6 Nxg6 15.Qc2 f4 16.Bd2 a6 [Black has a terrible score in the games that have reached this position. Damljanovic,B (2559)-Nevednichy,V (2582)/Novi Sad 2000/ continued 16...c5 17.dxc6 bxc6 18.c5 d5 19.Bd3 d4 20.Na4 Bf6 21.0–0–0 Kg7 22.Rdg1 Ng5 23.Nxg5 Bxg5 24.b3 Qe7 25.Bc4 Bg4 26.f3 Bd7 27.Be1 Rh8 28.Rh5 Be8 29.Rgh1 Nf8 30.R5h2 Nd7 31.Kb1 and was drawn after 58 moves, whilst 16...Ng5 17.Nxg5 Qxg5 18.g3 Qf6 19.0–0–0 Bd7 20.Kb1 a6 21.Bc1 Rab8 22.Rh2 b5 23.Rdh1 h6 24.Rg1 b4 25.Nd1 c6 26.Qa4 Be8 27.dxc6 Ne7 28.gxf4 Nxc6 29.Bh5 Bxh5 30.Qxc6 Rbc8 31.Qd5+ Bf7 32.Qd2 Bxc4 33.f5 was played in Popov,V (2545)-Solovjov,S (2430)/St Petersburg 2001 which white won after 41 moves) 17.0–0–0 Bd7 18.Rdg1 b5 19.g3 Qf6 20.Bd3 Nh6 21.gxf4 Nxf4 22.Ng5 b4 23.Ne2 c5 [The final mistake, but it was difficult to see how black could survive anyway after 23...Nxe2+ 24.Bxe2 Kh8 25.Rg2 a5 26.Rgh2] 24.Nxf4 exf4

Gibraltar r2 7

25.Nxh7! The point. Of course, the knight cannot be taken due to the resultant deadly discovered check. 25…Qd4 26.Rxh6 1–0

Dutch GM Ivan Sokolov (2657) faced English IM Lawrence Trent (2487). The Englishman had the better of the game early on, sacrificing material, but eventually his attack petered out and an interesting K+2N+B -v- K+R+2P was reached after black played 62…Ra5

Gibraltar r2 8

The game continued 63.Nxf4 Ra7 64.Bc6 Ra6 65.Bd5 Ra5 66.Kf2 Rxd5! Simplifying into a book win for white – but not one that can be won in 50 moves with best play!! 67.Nxd5 Kg6 68.Nh4+ Kg5 69.Kg3 h5 70.Kh3 Kh6 71.Kg2 Kg7 72.Kf3 Kf7 73.Ke4 Ke6 74.Kd4 Kd6 75.Nb4 Ke6 76.Nd3 Kd6 77.Ne5 Ke6 78.Nc4 Kf6 79.Nd2 Ke6 80.Ne4 Kd7 81.Kd5 Kc7 82.Kc5 Kd7 83.Ng5 Ke7 84.Kd5 Kf6 85.Ngf3 Ke7 86.Ne5 Kf6 87.Neg6 Kg5 88.Ke5 Kg4 89.Kf6 Kg3 90.Kf5 Kf2 91.Ke4 Kg3 92.Kf5 Kf2 93.Nf4 Kg3 94.Nfg2 Kf2 95.Kf4 Ke2 96.Ke4 Kd2 97.Kd4 Kc2 98.Ne3+ Kd2 99.Nf1+ Ke1 100.Ng3 Kd2 101.Ne4+ Ke2 102.Nd6 Kd2 103.Nc4+ Kc2 104.Na5 Kd2 105.Nb3+ Ke2 106.Nc5 Kf2 107.Ne4+ Ke2 108.Ng3+ Kd2 109.Nf1+ Ke1 110.Ng3 Kd2 white has made no progress ½–½

England’s David Collier (2083) will be delighted to have beaten Qatari IM Hussein Aziz Nezad (2403), also as black. Collier played 70…Ra2+ and must have been counting the half point, and wondering what to have for dinner.

Gibraltar r2 9

He must have been amazed at whites reply of 71 Kc3?? [white draws trivially after 71 Ke1] and won with 71…Rxa7! 72 Re8 Ra1 1-0

One of the more interesting struggles took place a few boards away as the 2003 co-champion, Greek GM Vassilios Kotronias (2603) was pitted against the veteran Spanish GM, Juan Bellon Lopez (2440). 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.0–0–0 This position has been played by many of the world’s elite players including World Champion Anand and former World Champions, Kasparov and Kramnik. 8…b5 [Bellon Lopez chooses the road less travelled. The immediate 8...Bb4 is more popular by far.] 9.f3 Bb4 10.Nb3 Ne5 11.Qe1 Rb8 12.Qg3?! [Although this gets White out of the pin, his queen turns out to be more vulnerable on g3. It would have been preferable to play 12.a3 Be7 13.f4 Nc4 14.e5 with good chances.] 12…0–0 13.Bd4 Bd6 14.f4 Nh5 15.fxe5!? [Kotronias realizes that his best practical chance is to surrender his queen for three minor pieces as the alternative 15.Qh4 Nxf4 leaves him down a pawn for no compensation in light of 16.Qxf4?? Nd3+ winning.] 15…Nxg3 16.exd6 Qxd6 17.hxg3 Qxg3

Gibraltar r2 11

A difficult position for both sides. White does not have any immediate targets to attack. Black, however, will need some time to activate those rooks.18.Rh3 Qg5+ 19.Be3 Qe5 20.g3 Qc7 21.Bf4?! [A more accurate continuation would have been 21.Bc5 Rd8 22.Bd6 Qa7 23.a3 Bb7 24.Bxb8 Qxb8 25.Nc5 with sufficient compensation for the queen.] 21…Qb6 [Black should not have feared 21...e5 as 22.Nd5 Qd8 23.Be3 d6 24.Rh4 f5 assures him a comfortable game.] 22.Nc5? [White overplays his hand. The direct 22.Bxb8 Qxb8 23.a3 is better.] 22…e5 23.Bxe5 Qxc5? [Black returns the favour by missing the powerful 23...d6! 24.Bxd6 Rd8 25.Bxb8 Rxd1+ 26.Kxd1 Bxh3 27.Bxh3 Qxb8 when White's minor pieces are no match for the versatility of Black's queen.] 24.Bxb8 d6 25.Bxd6 Qe3+ 26.Kb1 Bxh3? [The game would have still been in the balance had Black seen 26...Bg4 27.Rc1 Bxh3 28.Bxh3 Ra8] 27.Bxf8 Now it is White that holds the upper hand. 27…Qg5 28.Rd5 Qf6 [White's rook cannot be allowed to get to the eighth rank. 28...Qxg3? 29.Rd8 Qc7 30.Be7+ Qxd8 31.Bxd8 Bxf1 32.e5 lets White have all the fun.] 29.Bxh3?! [Even more convincing is 29.Bc5 Qxf1+ 30.Rd1 Qf6 31.Nd5+-] 29…Kxf8 30.a3 Qf3 31.Bc8 Qxg3 32.Bxa6 g5 33.Bxb5 h5 34.Ne2 Qe3 35.Nd4 Qxe4 36.Bc6 Qf4 37.b4 h4 38.Nf5 Kg8 39.b5 Qc7 40.Rd7 Qa5 41.Kb2 h3 42.Nh6+ Kg7 43.Nxf7 h2 44.Ne5+ Kg8 45.Bd5+ Kf8 46.Rf7+ Ke8 47.Bc6+ Kd8 48.Rd7+ Kc8 49.Bb7+ 1–0

Frits Obers (2107), a regular visitor to Gibraltar from The Netherlands will be pleased with his effort today when he drew with the black pieces against Spanish GM Gabriel Del Rio (2532).

The Round 3 pairings promise some exciting games tomorrow – all of which can be watched live via www.gibraltarchesscongress.com

Report compiled by Sean Hewitt with games annotated by Sunil Weeramantry.

Kuzubov Wins Gurgaon International Open Tourney

Five players shared first, Kuzubov with best tiebreak

Press release, Gurgaon (29 Jan 09) – Second seed Yuriy Kuzubov of Ukriane won the Gurgaon International Open Grandmasters Chess Tournament with 8 points here at Suncity World School today. Kuzubov tied for the top spot along with country mate and top seed Alexander Areshchenko, Indian Grandmaster Neelotpal Das, Kazak Grandmaster Anuar Ismagambetov and International Master RR Laxman. But better tie break score helped Kuzubov to take the top position and winner’s trophy.

In the final round, Kuzubov settled for a quick draw against National Under-25 champion RR Laxman in just 8 moves while Areshchenko had the same results against Neelotpal Das. Anuar Ismagambetov defeated T U Navin Kanna in the final round encounter and tied for the pole position with 8 points. The five ways tie resolved by bucholz score and Kuzubov edged out rest four. Areshenchenko finished second while Laxman, Anuar and Neelotpal secured third, fourth and fifth position respectively. But all the five pocketed Rs.1,12,000/- as prize money as the prize money shared among the tied players as per the tournament rules.

Yuri Kuzubov 1

Yuriy Kuzubov

Laxman, Girinath and Shivanda achieved their grandmaster norms while Shashikant Kutwal and Akash Thakur achieved International Master Norms. Uzbek girl, Muminova Nafisa declared as the best women player of the tournament and she also achieved her Women International Master Norm from this tournament. A P Joshua finished first among unrated players while in the veteran category International Master Boris Arkhangelsky finished at the top.

In the closing ceremony, Kathak Legend Pandit Birju Maharaj gave away the prizes in presence of Shri. KC Wadhwa, Chairman Lions Public School, Shri. Jitender Bhardwaj, Member Grievance Committee, Shri KK Yadav, Film producer, Smt. Rupa Chakravarty, Pricipal Suncity World School, Shri. Pradeep Gupta Secretary Haryana Chess Association, Shri. Raju Verma, President Gurgaon District Chess Association, Shri. Naresh Sharma, General Secretary Gurgaon District Chess Association, CA Naresh Garg, Convenor, Shri. Rajpal Singh Chuhan , Shri. SS Rawat, Shri. Sharmendra Singh and Anil Kumar Parmani.

Final Standings:

1. GM Yuriy Kuzubov of Ukraine with 8 points

2. GM Alexander Areshchenko of Ukraine with 8 points

3. IM R R Laxman of India with 8 points

4. GM Anuar Ismagambetov of Kazakhstan with 8 points

5. GM Neelotpal Das of India with 8 points

6. MR Lalith Babu of India with 7.5 points

7. GM Mikhail Ulibin of Russia with 7.5 points

8. GM Evgeny Gleizerov of Russia with 7.5 points

9. IM Deep Sengupta of India with 7.5 points

10. IM PDS Girinath of India with 7.5 points

Important Results of Round 10 (Indians otherwise stated):

GM Alexander Areshchenko of Ukraine (8) drew with GM Neelotpal Das (8) ; Yuriy Kuzubov of Ukraine (8) drew with IM RR Laxman (8) ; IM PDS Girinath (7.5) drew with GM Evgeny Gleizerov of Russia (7.5) ; GM Anuar Ismagambetov of Kazakhstan (8) beat T U Navin Kanna (7) ; Mehar Chinna Reddy (7.5) drew with Mikhail Ulibin of Russia (7.5 ; Yuri Solodovnichenko of Ukraine (7) drew with Anwesh Upadhyaya (7.5) ; GM Saidali Iuldachev of Uzbekistan (6.5) lost to IM Himanshu Sharma (7.5) ; Somak Palit (6.5) lost to M R Lalith Babu (7.5) ; GM Praveen Thipsay (7) drew with IM N Srinath (7) ; FM S Nitin (6.5) lost to Deep Sengupta (7.5) ; IM B T Murali Krishnan (6.5) lost to B S Shivananda (7.5) ; Shashikant Kutwal (7) drew with IM K Rathnakaran (7) ; Akash Thakur (7.5) beat GM Niaz Murshed of Bangladesh (6.5) ; IM S P Sethuraman (7) drew with P Saravana Krishnan (7) ; T Purushothaman (6.5) lost to GM Nurlan Ibrayev of Kazakhstan (7.5) ; GM Abhijit Kunte (6.5) drew with P Maheswaran (6.5) ; Sagar Shah (6) lost to IM B Adhiban (7) ; IM P Konguvel (7) beat FM Mohannad Farhan (6) ; IM Shyam Sundar (7) beat IM R Balasubramaniam (6) ; Ram Prakash (6) lost to M S Thejkumar (7).

Round 9 report

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Four share lead, tournament heading for an exciting finish

Gurgaon International Open Grandmasters Chess Tournament

Press release, Gurgaon (27 Jan 09) – Gurgaon International Open Grandmasters Chess Tournament heading for an exciting finish here at Suncity World School as after the penultimate round four players, namely Areshchenko, Kuzubov, Neelotpal and Laxman are sharing the top spot with 7.5 points.

At the top board, displaying a solid tactical game R R Laxman signed the peace treaty against top seed Ukrainian Grandmaster Alexander Areshchenko in 21 moves while another Ukrainian grandmaster in the fray second seed Yuriy Kuzubov defeated Indian International Master Deep Sengupta in 54 moves. Grandmaster Neelotpal Das kept his chances alive in this Rs. 10 lakh prize money event as he over powered Uzbek grandmaster Saidali Iuldachev in the ninth round encounter.

Continuing his fine form in the tournament, talented youngster Anwesh Upadhyaya held Russian Grandmaster Mikhail Ulibin to a creditable draw while in a major upset of the day Mehar Chinna Reddy outwitted highly rated Uzbek Grandmaster Safin Shukhrat and B S Shivananda defeated Indian Grandmaster Magesh Chandran in the penultimate round and achieved an International Master Norm during the process. Giant killer of the tournament, former National Under-17 champion Saravana Krishanan defeated state mate C Praveen Kumar in the ninth round and achieved an International Master norm.

Interesting ninth round encounter between Grandmaster Abhijit Kunte and PDS Girinath in progress at the time of this report.

Important Results of Round 9 (Indians otherwise stated):

IM RR Laxman (7.5) drew with GM Alexander Areshchenko of Ukraine (7.5); GM Yuriy Kuzubov (7.5) beat IM Deep Sengupta (6.5) ; GM Neelotpal Das (7.5) beat GM Saidali Iuldachev of Uzbekistan (6.5) ; GM Mihail Ulibin of Russia (7) drew with Anwesh Upadhyaya (7) ; GM Nurlan Ibrayev of Kazakhstan (6.5) drew with GM Yuri Solodovnichenko of Ukraine (6.5) ; GM Evgeny Gleizerov of Russia (7) beat IM Arghyadip Das (6) ; IM PDS Girinath () v GM Abhijit Kunte () ; GM Anuar Ismagambetov of Kazakhstan (7) beat FM Djuraev Sokhib of Tajikistan (6) ; IM Himanshu Sharma (6.5) drew with IM B T Murali Krishnan (6.5) ; GM Niaz Murshed of Bangladesh (6.5) drew with IM N Srinath (6.5) ; T U Navin Kanna (7) beat IM Shyam Sundar (6) ; Sashikant Kutwal (6.5) drew with IM S P Sethuraman (6.5) ; Mehar Chinna Reddy (7) beat GM Safin Shukhrat of Uzbekistan (5.5) ; B S Shivananda (6.5) beat GM P Magesh Chandran (5.5) ; M R Lalith Babu (6.5) beat FM Esenov Annaberdi of Turkmenistan (5.5) ; Rahul Sangma (6) drew with IM P Konguvel (6) ; WGM Soumya Swaminathan (5.5) lost to GM Praveen Thipsay (6.5) ; IM K Rathnakaran (6.5) beat IM Boris Arkhangelsky of Russia (5.5) ; M S Thejkumar (6) drew with P Maheswaran (6) ; IM Saptarshi Roy (6) drew with Sagar Shah (6)

Round 8 report

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Gashimov held to a draw at the start of the Gibraltar chess festival

Svidler, Nakamura, Vachier-Lagrave, Harikrishna and Berkes win

The Gibraltar chess festival started yesterday with an exciting first round and high participation of over 180 players in the main group. Heavy weight favorites won their games, with a few exceptions. The most obvious stun of the day was of the rating favorite GM Gashimov. He was held to a draw by Gary Quillan (ENG, 2357). To make the English celebration in round 1 even bigger, IM Jovanka Houska (2392) held GM Vadim Milov to a draw with black.

Two of the other top contenders GM Svidler and GM Nakamura did not have problems at the start of the tournament. The strong Indian participants GM Harikrishna, GM Sandipan, IM Sachdev, and GM Ganguly also scored full points.

It was a double edged day for Sweden, as GM Berg won against FM Ashton, FM Nithander held GM Roiz to a draw, but GM Pia Cramling lost to FM Fruebing.

Scroll down (after the photos) to find all the results from round 1 and the pairings from round 2. The games from the Gibraltar Chess Festival can be viewed live daily on the Chessdom.com and the official site.

spassky

Boris Spassky visits Gibraltar

by Stewart Reuben

People often say to me, “Grandmasters are very stand-offish.” My response is usually, “Have you ever approached one?” “Oh, no I couldn’t do that.” “Well,” I respond, “Is it not you who is being hard to talk to?” One of the glories of the Gibraltar Chess Festival is that not only play takes place in the Caleta Hotel, but also that is where most of the players stay. Thus you can meet socially players from all over the world from many different backgrounds. This year Boris Spassky, World Champion 1969-72, was a guest of the hotel for three days. It was his defence of the title against the American, Bobby Fischer, which caught the interest of the general public more than any other in the 1500 year history of chess. It is true that Bobby won their epic clash, but that in no way detracts from the status of Boris as one of the great icons of the game.

I think it was about the fifth time of being introduced to Boris that he finally realised he had met this young man before. But since then I have organised several events in which he participated and we have come to know each other quite well. Thus I was delighted when I learnt he was coming to Gibraltar.

The first day of any chess congress is fraught with problems. Thus it fell to me to accompany Boris on a tour of the Rock arranged by the Tourist Board. I was quite surprised to learn how knowledgeable he was about the history of Gibraltar. Most of us, had we lived through the siege of Leningrad during the Second World War, would have had other matters on our mind. I had been to most of the sights before, of course, but this was my first time in the siege tunnels. Until recently that trip was rather arduous and long. Now I discovered there was a conducted tour lasting about 30 minutes virtually all on the flat. Boris quickly came to realise that the ancient chess aphorism, ‘The threat is stronger than its execution’, applied during the war. Germany never tried to take Gibraltar and thus was never able to take control of shipping in the area. The strategic importance of The Rock remains just as valid today.

Boris didn’t want to pose for the usual tourist photos with the apes and in St Michael’s Caves. Even so, I hope you enjoy a photographic montage of our two hour trip.

gashimov

Gashimov was held to a draw by Gary Quillan

vachier lagrave

Vachier-Lagrave, one of the top French talents, won in round 1

svidler

Svidler won, but he might be changing chess with cricket

stefanova

Spassky making the first move of the ex World Champion Antoaneta Stefanova

sachdev

Tania Sachdev happy in Gibraltar

For more fantastic photos by Sean Hewitt from Gibraltar visit http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/Sean.D.Hewitt

Results round 1

1 Quillan, Gary 0.0 ENG 2357 GM Gashimov, Vugar 0.0 AZE 2723 ½-½

2 GM Svidler, Peter 0.0 RUS 2723 FM Van Eijk, Sander 0.0 NED 2355 1-0

3 FM Leniart, Arkadiusz 0.0 POL 2360 GM Nakamura, Hikaru 0.0 USA 2699 0-1

4 GM Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 0.0 FRA 2696 IM Kharous, Ernest 0.0 RUS 2400 1-0

5 FM Perez Ponsa, Federico 0.0 ARG 2390 GM Harikrishna, Pentala 0.0 IND 2673 0-1

6 GM Milov, Vadim 0.0 SUI 2669 IM Houska, Jovanka w 0.0 ENG 2392 ½-½

7 IM Welling, Gerard 0.0 NED 2371 GM Sokolov, Ivan 0.0 NED 2657 0-1

8 GM Berkes, Ferenc 0.0 HUN 2651 WGM Calzetta, Monica w 0.0 ESP 2371 1-0

9 FM Nithander, Victor 0.0 SWE 2369 GM Roiz, Michael 0.0 ISR 2647 ½-½

10 GM Beliavsky, Alexander G 0.0 SLO 2646 Carlhammar, Magnus 0.0 SWE 2351 1-0

11 IM Solomon, Kenny 0.0 RSA 2348 GM Avrukh, Boris 0.0 ISR 2645 0-1

12 GM Socko, Bartosz 0.0 POL 2631 IM Maryasin, Boris 0.0 ISR 2340 1-0

13 FM Miedema, Roi 0.0 NED 2325 GM Gurevich, Mikhail 0.0 TUR 2624 0-1

14 GM Akobian, Varuzhan 0.0 USA 2619 IM Klinova, Masha w 0.0 ISR 2328 1-0

15 FM Forsaa, Espen 0.0 NOR 2322 GM Ganguly, Surya Shekhar 0.0 IND 2614 0-1

16 GM Berg, Emanuel 0.0 SWE 2606 FM Ashton, Adam G 0.0 ENG 2321 1-0

17 FM Ripari, Marcelo i 0.0 ARG 2313 GM Kotronias, Vasilios 0.0 GRE 2603 0-1

18 GM Golod, Vitali 0.0 ISR 2575 Rasch, Holger 0.0 GER 2301 1-0

19 GM Andersson, Ulf 0.0 SWE 2571 FM Jessel, Stephen 0.0 IRL 2296 Did not play

20 GM Sandipan, Chanda 0.0 IND 2568 FM Thomassen, Joachim 0.0 NOR 2290 1-0

21 FM Armbrust, Florian 0.0 GER 2321 GM Stefanova, Antoaneta w 0.0 BUL 2557 0-1

22 GM Cramling, Pia w 0.0 SWE 2548 FM Fruebing, Stefan 0.0 GER 2307 0-1

23 Stebbings, Anthony J i 0.0 ENG 2290 GM Lopez Martinez, Josep Manu 0.0 ESP 2540 ½-½

24 GM Speelman, Jon S 0.0 ENG 2536 FM Csonka, Attila Istvan 0.0 HUN 2289 0-1

25 Bok, Benjamin 0.0 NED 2277 GM Del Rio De Angelis, Salvad 0.0 ESP 2532 ½-½

26 IM Hammer, Jon Ludvig 0.0 NOR 2532 FM Sanchez, Louis 0.0 FRA 2263 1-0

27 Malmdin, Nils-Ake 0.0 SWE 2256 IM Gordon, Stephen J 0.0 ENG 2524 0-1

28 GM Pavlovic, Milos 0.0 SRB 2520 IM Peredy, Ferenc 0.0 HUN 2252 1-0

29 FM White, Michael J R 0.0 ENG 2251 GM Dzagnidze, Nana w 0.0 GEO 2518 0-1

30 IM Papp, Gabor 0.0 HUN 2517 Chapman, Terry P D 0.0 ENG 2251 1-0

31 Tscharotschkin, Michael 0.0 GER 2248 GM Berczes, David 0.0 HUN 2513 0-1

32 GM Carlsson, Pontus 0.0 SWE 2509 Natalicchio Escalante, Nic 0.0 ESP 2238 1-0

33 FM Hartvig, Ove Weiss 0.0 DEN 2237 IM Szabo, Krisztian 0.0 HUN 2508 ½-½

34 IM Arakhamia-Grant, Ketevan w 0.0 SCO 2500 Spence, David J 0.0 ENG 2223 1-0

35 CM Dunn, Andrew 0.0 ENG 2216 GM Hauchard, Arnaud 0.0 FRA 2497 0-1

36 IM Cmilyte, Viktorija w 0.0 LTU 2497 Pantaleoni, Claudio 0.0 ITA 2211 ½-½

37 Daoudi, Kamal 0.0 MAR 2209 IM Al Sayed, Mohamad N. 0.0 QAT 2488 0-1

38 IM Trent, Lawrence 0.0 ENG 2487 Kandic, Milan 0.0 SRB 2208 1-0

39 Kvisla, Johannes Luangtep 0.0 NOR 2208 IM Nemeth, Miklos 0.0 HUN 2472 0-1

40 IM Kiik, Kalle 0.0 EST 2466 Bravetti, Antonio i 0.0 ITA 2205 1-0

41 De Groote, Ewoud 0.0 NED 2203 IM Zatonskih, Anna w 0.0 USA 2462 0-1

42 IM Bruno, Fabio 0.0 ITA 2460 Van Den Bersselaar, Jeroen 0.0 NED 2191 1-0

43 Getz, Nicolai 0.0 NOR 2190 IM Krush, Irina w 0.0 USA 2457 0-1

44 GM Socko, Monika w 0.0 POL 2449 CM Walton, Alan J 0.0 ENG 2189 1-0

45 Van Heirzeele, Daniel 0.0 BEL 2189 IM D`Costa, Lorin A R 0.0 ENG 2445 ½-½

46 GM Bellon Lopez, Juan Manuel 0.0 ESP 2440 IM Kozlov, Oleg 0.0 RUS 2187 1-0

47 Hagesaether, Arne 0.0 NOR 2184 IM Devereaux, Maxim L 0.0 ENG 2437 0-1

48 IM Sachdev, Tania w 0.0 IND 2435 Lovik, Lasse Ostebo 0.0 NOR 2184 1-0

49 Salem, Ihab 0.0 PLE 2171 FM Hommeles, Theo 0.0 NED 2410 0-1

50 IM Karim, Ismael 0.0 MAR 2407 Heinis, Vincent 0.0 FRA 2170 ½-½

51 Tate, Alan 0.0 SCO 2170 IM Nezad, Husein Aziz 0.0 QAT 2403 1-0

52 Vea, Odin Blikra 0.0 NOR 2169 Suez-Panama, Gilles 0.0 FRA 2032 1-0

53 Brown, Thomas 0.0 WLS 2027 Steffenello, Leonard 0.0 BRA 2164 1-0

54 Byron, Alan M 0.0 ENG 2162 Dasaolu, Adeoye 0.0 ENG 2024 1-0

55 Campbell, Ian 0.0 ENG 2023 Gavriel, Tryfon C 0.0 ENG 2161 ½-½

56 Perez Aleman, Pedro Tomas 0.0 ESP 2160 Pettersen, Joar Gullestad 0.0 NOR 2016 1-0

57 Cafolla, Peter 0.0 IRL 2013 Whitehead, David J i 0.0 ENG 2155 1-0

58 IM Erdelyi, Tamas 0.0 HUN 2152 Spanton, Tim R 0.0 ENG 2008 0-1

59 Zanetti, Bruno 0.0 SUI 2008 Samuelsson, Sven-Gunnar 0.0 SWE 2142 1-0

60 Drenth, Jean Paul 0.0 NED 2140 Hickman, John E 0.0 ENG 2002 ½-½

61 Demac, Elias 0.0 NOR 1993 Green, Andrew D 0.0 SCO 2136 ½-½

62 Machin Arbelo, Pedro Alexi 0.0 ESP 2134 Madland, Kristoffer 0.0 NOR 1992 0-1

63 Helin, Mikael 0.0 SWE 1974 Almond, Richard J 0.0 ENG 2126 0-1

64 Arnott, Jonathan W 0.0 ENG 2117 Benson, Oisin P. 0.0 IRL 1957 0-1

65 Webster, Richard J 0.0 ENG 1956 Haugstad, Espen 0.0 NOR 2114 0-1

66 Hagen, Anders Gjerdrum 0.0 NOR 2110 Haug, Marianne Wold w 0.0 NOR 1935 ½-½

67 Brown, David 0.0 ENG 1932 Ogada-Osir, Ibrahim Okinyi i 0.0 AUS 2110 ½-½

68 Obers, Frits 0.0 NED 2107 Skage, Oystein Aagedal 0.0 NOR 1925 1-0

69 Loberg, Jo Kristian 0.0 NOR 1923 Mundaca Alvarez, Juan Carl 0.0 CHI 2105 ½-½

70 Aerni, Andi 0.0 SUI 2102 De Lillo, Michele i 0.0 ITA 1918 ½-½

71 Mozelius, Peter 0.0 SWE 1916 Ercan, Mehmet Fahri 0.0 TUR 2091 0-1

72 Fox, Anthony 0.0 IRL 2085 Escofet Llongueras, Joan 0.0 ESP 1889 1-0

73 Carlsen, Ellen Oen w 0.0 NOR 1888 Horton-Kitchlew, Andrew 0.0 ENG 2084 1-0

74 Collier, David O 0.0 ENG 2083 Ribon Calabia, Mariano 0.0 ESP 1864 1-0

75 Szabo, Gabor 0.0 HUN 1862 Fryer, David W 0.0 ENG 2080 0-1

76 Compton, Alistair 0.0 NZL 2079 Aagedal, Geir Ole 0.0 NOR 1832 1-0

77 Matto, Manuel 0.0 ENG 1855 Perman, Torvald 0.0 FIN 2077 0-1

78 Gonzalez Amaya, Millan 0.0 ESP 1831 Pieri, Enzo 0.0 ITA 1829 1-0

79 Yarur Elsaca, Daniel 0.0 CHI 1805 Fairbairn, Stephen 0.0 CAN 2068 0-1

80 Lyons, Brendan 0.0 IRL 2060 Kuenitz, Klaus 0.0 GER 1663 0-1

81 Chidi, Lovinia Sylvia 0.0 GER 0 Lumsdon, Andrew 0.0 SUI 2051 0-1

82 Pali, Gabor 0.0 HUN 2048 Bishop, Geoffrey L 0.0 ENG 0 0-1

83 Kouchak, Jason 0.0 FRA 0 Gandrud, Vegar Koi 0.0 NOR 2046 0-1

84 Obiamiwe, Paul i 0.0 NGR 2035 Salomon, Johan 0.0 NOR 0 1-0

85 Viera Falcon, Cristo 0.0 ESP 0 Linqvist, Grels 0.0 FIN 2034 0-1

86 WIM Tsifanskaya, Ludmila A w 0.0 ISR 2149 Beltran Medina, Jorge 0.0 MEX 2006 ½-½

87 CM Osuna Vega, Enrique 0.0 ESP 2130 Bates, Caspar J 0.0 ENG 2142 0-1

88 Dimitrijevic, Dragan 0.0 ITA 2069 Valhondo Morales, Ruben 0.0 ESP 1754 1-0

90 Garcia Lechugo, Francisco 0.0 ESP 1688 Flores Chico, Jorge 0.0 ESP 2121 0-1

91 Pollo Mancilla, Ricardo 0.0 ESP 0 Vinas Guerrero, Carlos A. 0.0 ESP 2104 0-1

93 Hamer, Martyn 0.0 ENG 2022 Wahlberg, Jockum 0.0 SWE 0 1-0

94 IM Capo Vidal, Uriel 0.0 MEX 2336 FM Dittmar, Peter 0.0 GER 2382 1-0

Pairings round 2

1 GM Berczes, David 1.0 HUN 2513 GM Svidler, Peter 1.0 RUS 2723

2 GM Nakamura, Hikaru 1.0 USA 2699 GM Carlsson, Pontus 1.0 SWE 2509

3 IM Al Sayed, Mohamad N. 1.0 QAT 2488 GM Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 1.0 FRA 2696

4 GM Harikrishna, Pentala 1.0 IND 2673 IM Arakhamia-Grant, Ketevan w 1.0 SCO 2500

5 GM Sokolov, Ivan 1.0 NED 2657 IM Trent, Lawrence 1.0 ENG 2487

6 GM Hauchard, Arnaud 1.0 FRA 2497 GM Berkes, Ferenc 1.0 HUN 2651

7 IM Nemeth, Miklos 1.0 HUN 2472 GM Beliavsky, Alexander G 1.0 SLO 2646

8 GM Avrukh, Boris 1.0 ISR 2645 IM Kiik, Kalle 1.0 EST 2466

9 IM Zatonskih, Anna w 1.0 USA 2462 GM Socko, Bartosz 1.0 POL 2631

10 GM Gurevich, Mikhail 1.0 TUR 2624 IM Bruno, Fabio 1.0 ITA 2460

11 IM Devereaux, Maxim L 1.0 ENG 2437 GM Akobian, Varuzhan 1.0 USA 2619

12 GM Ganguly, Surya Shekhar 1.0 IND 2614 GM Socko, Monika w 1.0 POL 2449

13 IM Krush, Irina w 1.0 USA 2457 GM Berg, Emanuel 1.0 SWE 2606

14 GM Kotronias, Vasilios 1.0 GRE 2603 GM Bellon Lopez, Juan Manuel 1.0 ESP 2440

15 IM Sachdev, Tania w 1.0 IND 2435 GM Golod, Vitali 1.0 ISR 2575

16 FM Hommeles, Theo 1.0 NED 2410 GM Sandipan, Chanda 1.0 IND 2568

17 GM Stefanova, Antoaneta w 1.0 BUL 2557 IM Capo Vidal, Uriel 1.0 MEX 2336

18 FM Fruebing, Stefan 1.0 GER 2307 IM Hammer, Jon Ludvig 1.0 NOR 2532

19 IM Gordon, Stephen J 1.0 ENG 2524 Urbina Perez, Juan Antonio 1.0 ESP 2215

20 FM Csonka, Attila Istvan 1.0 HUN 2289 GM Pavlovic, Milos 1.0 SRB 2520

21 GM Dzagnidze, Nana w 1.0 GEO 2518 Tate, Alan 1.0 SCO 2170

22 FM Jessel, Stephen 1.0 IRL 2296 IM Papp, Gabor 1.0 HUN 2517

23 GM Gashimov, Vugar 0.5 AZE 2723 Vea, Odin Blikra 1.0 NOR 2169

24 GM Lopez Martinez, Josep Manu 0.5 ESP 2540 Perez Aleman, Pedro Tomas 1.0 ESP 2160

25 GM Roiz, Michael 0.5 ISR 2647 Byron, Alan M 1.0 ENG 2162

26 Bates, Caspar J 1.0 ENG 2142 GM Milov, Vadim 0.5 SUI 2669

27 GM Del Rio De Angelis, Salvad 0.5 ESP 2532 Obers, Frits 1.0 NED 2107

28 Vinas Guerrero, Carlos A. 1.0 ESP 2104 IM Szabo, Krisztian 0.5 HUN 2508

29 Ercan, Mehmet Fahri 1.0 TUR 2091 IM Cmilyte, Viktorija w 0.5 LTU 2497

30 IM D`Costa, Lorin A R 0.5 ENG 2445 Fox, Anthony 1.0 IRL 2085

31 Fryer, David W 1.0 ENG 2080 IM Karim, Ismael 0.5 MAR 2407

32 IM Houska, Jovanka w 0.5 ENG 2392 Dimitrijevic, Dragan 1.0 ITA 2069

33 Lumsdon, Andrew 1.0 SUI 2051 FM Nithander, Victor 0.5 SWE 2369

34 Madland, Kristoffer 1.0 NOR 1992 IM Vernay, Clovis 0.5 FRA 2338

35 Almond, Richard J 1.0 ENG 2126 GM Andersson, Ulf 0.0 SWE 2571

36 Flores Chico, Jorge 1.0 ESP 2121 GM Cramling, Pia w 0.0 SWE 2548

37 Haugstad, Espen 1.0 NOR 2114 GM Speelman, Jon S 0.0 ENG 2536

38 IM Nezad, Husein Aziz 0.0 QAT 2403 Collier, David O 1.0 ENG 2083

39 IM Kharous, Ernest 0.0 RUS 2400 Compton, Alistair 1.0 NZL 2079

40 Perman, Torvald 1.0 FIN 2077 FM Perez Ponsa, Federico 0.0 ARG 2390

41 Fairbairn, Stephen 1.0 CAN 2068 IM Welling, Gerard 0.0 NED 2371

42 Gandrud, Vegar Koi 1.0 NOR 2046 FM Leniart, Arkadiusz 0.0 POL 2360

43 FM Dittmar, Peter 0.0 GER 2382 Obiamiwe, Paul i 1.0 NGR 2035

44 WGM Calzetta, Monica w 0.0 ESP 2371 Brown, Thomas 1.0 WLS 2027

45 Linqvist, Grels 1.0 FIN 2034 Quillan, Gary 0.5 ENG 2357

46 FM Van Eijk, Sander 0.0 NED 2355 Hamer, Martyn 1.0 ENG 2022

47 Carlhammar, Magnus 0.0 SWE 2351 Cafolla, Peter 1.0 IRL 2013

48 Spanton, Tim R 1.0 ENG 2008 IM Solomon, Kenny 0.0 RSA 2348

49 IM Maryasin, Boris 0.0 ISR 2340 Zanetti, Bruno 1.0 SUI 2008

50 Benson, Oisin P. 1.0 IRL 1957 FM Miedema, Roi 0.0 NED 2325

51 IM Klinova, Masha w 0.0 ISR 2328 Carlsen, Ellen Oen w 1.0 NOR 1888

52 FM Ashton, Adam G 0.0 ENG 2321 Gonzalez Amaya, Millan 1.0 ESP 1831

53 Kuenitz, Klaus 1.0 GER 1663 FM Forsaa, Espen 0.0 NOR 2322

54 Bishop, Geoffrey L 1.0 ENG 0 FM Armbrust, Florian 0.0 GER 2321

55 Pantaleoni, Claudio 0.5 ITA 2211 Stebbings, Anthony J i 0.5 ENG 2290

56 Van Heirzeele, Daniel 0.5 BEL 2189 Bok, Benjamin 0.5 NED 2277

57 Heinis, Vincent 0.5 FRA 2170 FM Hartvig, Ove Weiss 0.5 DEN 2237

58 Gavriel, Tryfon C 0.5 ENG 2161 FM Ripari, Marcelo i 0.0 ARG 2313

59 Rasch, Holger 0.0 GER 2301 WIM Tsifanskaya, Ludmila A w 0.5 ISR 2149

60 FM Thomassen, Joachim 0.0 NOR 2290 Drenth, Jean Paul 0.5 NED 2140

61 Green, Andrew D 0.5 SCO 2136 Malmdin, Nils-Ake 0.0 SWE 2256

62 FM Sanchez, Louis 0.0 FRA 2263 Fellousi, Abdelaziz 0.5 MAR 2112

63 IM Peredy, Ferenc 0.0 HUN 2252 Hagen, Anders Gjerdrum 0.5 NOR 2110

64 Ogada-Osir, Ibrahim Okinyi i 0.5 AUS 2110 FM White, Michael J R 0.0 ENG 2251

65 Mundaca Alvarez, Juan Carl 0.5 CHI 2105 Tscharotschkin, Michael 0.0 GER 2248

66 Chapman, Terry P D 0.0 ENG 2251 Aerni, Andi 0.5 SUI 2102

67 Natalicchio Escalante, Nic 0.0 ESP 2238 Campbell, Ian 0.5 ENG 2023

68 Beltran Medina, Jorge 0.5 MEX 2006 CM Dunn, Andrew 0.0 ENG 2216

69 Haug, Marianne Wold w 0.5 NOR 1935 Daoudi, Kamal 0.0 MAR 2209

70 Spence, David J 0.0 ENG 2223 Demac, Elias 0.5 NOR 1993

71 Hickman, John E 0.5 ENG 2002 Kvisla, Johannes Luangtep 0.0 NOR 2208

72 Skage, Oystein Aagedal 0.0 NOR 1925 IM Erdelyi, Tamas 0.0 HUN 2152

73 Kandic, Milan 0.0 SRB 2208 Brown, David 0.5 ENG 1932

74 Bravetti, Antonio i 0.0 ITA 2205 Loberg, Jo Kristian 0.5 NOR 1923

75 De Lillo, Michele i 0.5 ITA 1918 De Groote, Ewoud 0.0 NED 2203

76 Van Den Bersselaar, Jeroen 0.0 NED 2191 Escandell Atienza, Santiag 0.5 ESP 1485

77 Escofet Llongueras, Joan 0.0 ESP 1889 Getz, Nicolai 0.0 NOR 2190

78 CM Walton, Alan J 0.0 ENG 2189 Helin, Mikael 0.0 SWE 1974

79 IM Kozlov, Oleg 0.0 RUS 2187 Webster, Richard J 0.0 ENG 1956

80 Ribon Calabia, Mariano 0.0 ESP 1864 Hagesaether, Arne 0.0 NOR 2184

81 Lovik, Lasse Ostebo 0.0 NOR 2184 Mozelius, Peter 0.0 SWE 1916

82 Pettersen, Joar Gullestad 0.0 NOR 2016 Salem, Ihab 0.0 PLE 2171

83 Steffenello, Leonard 0.0 BRA 2164 Szabo, Gabor 0.0 HUN 1862

84 Whitehead, David J i 0.0 ENG 2155 Matto, Manuel 0.0 ENG 1855

85 Knight, Simon 0.0 ENG 2148 Yarur Elsaca, Daniel 0.0 CHI 1805

86 Samuelsson, Sven-Gunnar 0.0 SWE 2142 Garcia Lechugo, Francisco 0.0 ESP 1688

87 Aagedal, Geir Ole 0.0 NOR 1832 Machin Arbelo, Pedro Alexi 0.0 ESP 2134

88 Pieri, Enzo 0.0 ITA 1829 CM Osuna Vega, Enrique 0.0 ESP 2130

89 Valhondo Morales, Ruben 0.0 ESP 1754 Arnott, Jonathan W 0.0 ENG 2117

90 Horton-Kitchlew, Andrew 0.0 ENG 2084 Chidi, Lovinia Sylvia 0.0 GER 0

91 Salomon, Johan 0.0 NOR 0 Lyons, Brendan 0.0 IRL 2060

92 Wahlberg, Jockum 0.0 SWE 0 Pali, Gabor 0.0 HUN 2048

93 Suez-Panama, Gilles 0.0 FRA 2032 Pollo Mancilla, Ricardo 0.0 ESP 0

94 Dasaolu, Adeoye 0.0 ENG 2024 Kouchak, Jason 0.0 FRA 0

Laxman downs Yuri Solodovnichenko, shares the lead with Areshchenko

Gurgaon International Open Grandmasters Chess Tournament

Press release, Gurgaon (27 Jan 09) – International Master R R Laxman outwitted Ukrainian Grandmaster Yuri Solodovnichenko in the eighth round of the Gurgaon International Open Grandmasters Chess Tournament here at Suncity World School on today and now share the top spot with 7 points along with top seed Alexander Areshchenko of Ukraine. Overnight sole leader Areshchenko settled for a quick draw against country mate second seed Yuriy Kuzubov in just 4 moves.

Displaying a fine attacking game in Ruy Lopez opening, Laxman gained a minor piece advantage in the 34th move and went on to seal the encounter in 48 moves. In the third board, Grandmaster Neelotpal Das and International Master Deep Sengupta signed the peace treaty after 50 moves and now sharing the second spot with 6.5 points along with Yuriy Kuzubov of Ukraine, Uzbek Grandmaster Saidali Iuldachev, Grandmaster Mikhail Ulibin of Russia and Anwesh Upadhyaya. Saidali beat B S Shivananda in the eighth round encounter while Ulibin got better of young Rahul Sangma and Anwesh defeated M R Lalith Babu.

IM Laxman

International Master R R Laxman

Former National Champion Abhijit Kunte drew his eighth round encounter against local International Master Himanshu Sharma while National “B” Champion International Master B Adhiban suffered a shock defeat from the hands of Tajikistan Fide Master Djuraev Sokhib. Other Indian Grandmasters in the fray, P Magesh Chandran settled for a draw against Soumya Swaminathan while Praveen Thipsay defeated Sahaj Grover in the eighth round matches.

Important Results of Round 8 (Indians otherwise stated):

GM Alexander Areshchenko of Ukraine (7) drew with Yuriy Kuzubov of Ukraine (6.5) ; Yuri Solodovnichenko of Ukraine (6) lost to IM R R Laxman (7) ; IM Deep Sengupta (6.5) drew with GM Neelotpal Das (6.5) ; IM Shyam Sundar (6) drew with GM Evgeny Gleizerov of Russia (6) ; GM Abhijit Kunte (6) drew with IM Himanshu Sharma (6) ; IM N Srinath (6) drew with GM Anuar Ismagambetov of Kazakhstan (6) ; GM Saidali Iuldachev of Uzbekistan (6.5) beat B S Shivanada (5.5) ; GM Mikhail Ulibin (6.5) beat Rahul Sangma (5.5) ; Anwesh Upadhyaya (6.5) beat M R Lalith Babu (5.5) ; IM BT Murali Krishnan (6) drew with Shashikant Kutwal (6) ; FM Djuraev Sokhib of Tajikistan (6) beat IM B Adhiban (5) ; GM P Magesh Chandran (5.5) drew with WGM Soumya Swaminathan (5.5) ; IM P Konguvel (5.5) drew with R Premnath (5.5) ; T U Navin Kanna (6) beat IM Justin Sarkar (5) ; Soumyaranjan Mishra (5) lost to GM Niaz Murshed (6) ; Sagar Shah (5.5) drew with M S Thejkumar (5.5) ; IM S P Sethuraman (6) beat IM R Balasubramaniam (5) ; T Purushothaman (5.5) drew with IM Saptarshi Roy (5.5) ; GM Nurlan Ibrayev (6) beat Arindam Mukherjee (5) ; IM Arghyadip Das (6) beat Jain Shreyansh Daklia (5).

For further details and live games please visit our website www.haryanachess.com

GM Arman Pashikian is the new Armenia chess champion

WIM Lilit Galojan wins the title for women

GM Arman Pashikian won the 69th Armenian Men’s Chess Championship that took place in Yerevan from 12 to 25 January. Pashikian won 8,5/13 points in the round robin event. GM Tigran Kotanjian got the second place with the same points, but worse tiebreak, while third place was for GM Zaven Andriasian

Final standings

1 GM Pashikian Arman ARM 2621 8.5

2 GM Kotanjian Tigran ARM 2568 8.5

3 GM Andriasian Zaven ARM 2564 8

4 IM Chibukhchian Artur ARM 2444 8

5 GM Minasian Artashes ARM 2557 7.5

6 IM Babujian Levon ARM 2518 7

7 GM Grigoryan Avetik ARM 2506 7

8 GM Petrosian Tigran L. ARM 2623 7

9 GM Anastasian Ashot ARM 2559 6.5

10 GM Melkumyan Hrant ARM 2519 6

11 IM Danielian Elina ARM 2496 5

12 GM Nalbandian Tigran ARM 2471 4.5

13 GM Ter-Sahakyan Samvel ARM 2506 4

14 GM Minasian Ara ARM 2477 3.5

All results from the open section

The women section gold medal was for WIM Lilit Galojan, who collected 7,5/9, half a point more than WIM Siranush Andriasian and Anna Hairapetian.

Final standings, women

1 WIM Galojan Lilit ARM 2316 7.5

2 WIM Andriasian Siranush ARM 2262 7

3 Hairapetian Anna ARM 2177 7

4 WIM Gasparian Narine ARM 2131 4.5

5 WGM Movsisian Naira ARM 2120 4.5

6 Khanamiryan Ani ARM 2001 3.5

7 Shakryan Zozan ARM 1969 3.5

8 Martirosyan Lia ARM 2109 3

9 Gasparian Mariana ARM 2078 3

10 Kharatyan Anahit ARM 2129 1.5

All results from the women section

More national championships

Georgia Chess Championship

Armenia Chess Championship

Polish Chess Championship

Croatia Chess Championship

Bulgarian semifinals

GM Mchedlishvili and IM Lomineishvili lead the Georgia Chess Championships

GM Mikheil Mchedlishvili leads the Georgia championship after 8 rounds

The rating favorite GM Mikheil Mchedlishvili leads the men section of the Georgian chess championship after 8 rounds. Mchedlishvili started the event with three draws against GM Arutinian, GM Pantsulaia, and Nigalidze and later gained speed with important victories against GM Shanava and IM Benidze. However, his title is not guaranteed as there are many rounds to the end and the opposition is close behind.

Here are the current standings

1 GM Mchedlishvili Mikheil GEO 2619 5.5

2 GM Gagunashvili Merab GEO 2585 5

3 GM Sanikidze Tornike GEO 2522 4.5

4 IM Margvelashvili Giorgi GEO 2484 4.5

5 GM Pantsulaia Levan GEO 2583 4.5

6 FM Bregadze Levan GEO 2394 4

7 Azaladze Shota GEO 2402 4

8 GM Shanava konstantine GEO 2508 4

9 Nigalidze Gaioz GEO 2458 3.5

10 IM Maghalashvili Davit GEO 2490 3.5

11 IM Benidze Davit GEO 2423 3.5

12 GM Arutinian David GEO 2586 3.5

13 GM Bagaturov Giorgi GEO 2492 3.5

14 WGM Charkhalashvili Inga GEO 2337 2.5

All results from the men section

IM Lomineishvili leading the women section, WFM Nazi Paikidze close behind

The experienced IM Lomineishvili is leading the women section of the Georgia championship. She gained 6,0/8 without losing a single game. The strong junior WFM Nazi Paikidze is only half a point away with a very strong performance. There are 4 players with 4,5/8 that can enter the medal race as well.

GM Nona Gaprindashvili is not having a good event and has gained only 2,5 points from 8 rounds.

1 IM Lomineishvili Maia GEO 2437 6
2 WFM Paikidze Nazi GEO 2280 5.5
3 IM Melia Salome GEO 2422 4.5
4 WIM Guramishvili Sopiko GEO 2281 4.5
5 WIM Tsatsalashvili Keti GEO 2231 4.5
6 IM Khukhashvili Sopiko GEO 2416 4.5
7 WIM Mikadze Miranda GEO 2287 4
8 IM Gvetadze Sopio GEO 2377 4
9 IM Khurtsidze Nino GEO 2421 3.5
10 WIM Danelia Mariam GEO 2219 2.5
11 GM Gaprindashvili Nona GEO 2376 2.5
12 WFM Arabidze Meri GEO 2246 2

All results from the women section

More national championships

Georgia Chess Championship

Armenia Chess Championship

Polish Chess Championship

Croatia Chess Championship

Bulgarian semifinals

GM Zdenko Kozul leading the Croatian Chess Championship

WIM Rajna Sargac is heading the women section

GM Zdenko Kozul is clear first in the Croatian Chess Championship after 8 rounds. GM Zdenko Kozul has 5,5/8 points and continues leading the balanced event, where all players are in the 2500 – 2600 range.

Second place is shared between GM Mladen Palac and GM Hrvoje Stevic, both with 5,0/8. The competition is a total of 11 rounds.

Standings after round 8

1 GM Kozul Zdenko CRO 2594 5.5

2 GM Palac Mladen CRO 2553 5

3 GM Stevic Hrvoje CRO 2592 5

4 GM Hulak Krunoslav CRO 2532 4.5

5 GM Saric Ivan CRO 2566 4

6 GM Bosiocic Marin CRO 2578 4

7 GM Zelcic Robert CRO 2569 4

8 GM Lalic Bogdan CRO 2538 3.5

9 GM Jovanic Ognjen CRO 2527 3.5

10 GM Jovanovic Zoran CRO 2558 3.5

11 GM Jankovic Alojzije CRO 2571 3

12 GM Cvitan Ognjen CRO 2542 2.5

Pairings and results

In the women section after 3 rounds the leader is WIM Rajna Sargac with 3,0/3. She is followed by WIM Solic and WIM Franciskovic with 2,5/3.

Standings after round 3, women section

1 WIM Sargac Rajna CRO 2198 3

2 WIM Solic Kristina CRO 2204 2.5

3 WIM Franciskovic Borka CRO 2260 2.5

4 NM Kruljac Petra CRO 2052 2

5 WIM Jelica Mara CRO 2222 2

6 WGM Medic Mirjana CRO 2303 1.5

7 MK Deur Zrinka CRO 2007 1

8 MK Ivekovic Ivana CRO 1942 1

9 WFM Berke Ana CRO 2081 0.5

10 MK Ivekovic Ana CRO 1931 0

Pairings and results

More national championships

Georgia Chess Championship

Armenia Chess Championship

Polish Chess Championship

Croatia Chess Championship

Bulgarian semifinals